Category Archives: Neighborhood Safety

Pflugerville Firefighters Remind You to Get Ready for Severe Weather

Flooding: TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN

Flooded road with carCentral Texas is known as a hotbed of flash floods, which are the #1 cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S. Most of these deaths occur when drivers try to drive through floodwaters, while others happen when pedestrians try to walk through or near flooded areas. Just six inches of rushing water can knock down an adult, and much less for a child.

Continue reading Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

Holiday Safety Tips

Santa Sneaky on Roof ColorWith the bustle of the holidays just around the corner, make sure you’re taking every precaution possible to keep your home and family safe and secure.  We usually see an increase in opportunistic crime this time of year; please remain vigilant.

  • Keep your blinds and drapes closed when away, even if only for a short period of time.
  • Keep your house well lit at night (backyard included). A motion sensor activated light is an inexpensive deterrent.
  • If your Christmas tree is displayed in front of a window, don’t pile the presents around it. Store the gifts in another area away from view when the blinds or drapes are open.
  • Do NOT put the empty boxes for the new computer, TV, stereo system, etc. on the curb for the trash. Take the time to break down every box and put it inside your trashcan/recycling bin so that it is concealed, even if you have to hold it over to the next week. People start cruising our neighborhood on Sunday afternoons to see what has been put out. The less they know, the better.
  • Door-to-door solicitations increase tremendously this time of year. Always look out the window or peephole before opening the door or answering a knock. Never open the door all the way, especially if you have a Christmas tree and/or presents in plain view.
  • While shopping this holiday season, remain aware of your surroundings at all times. If unsure of your safety, ask a store attendant to have security walk you to your car. You can’t be too safe. This goes for trips to the grocery store as well. When unloading your car at home after a day of shopping, lock it between trips to and from the car.
  • Always lock your car. Never leave your car running unattended or leave your keys in the car or ignition. If you usually keep a garage door remote control in your car and don’t park it in the garage each and every time you return home, hide the remote or take it inside. Thieves check visors and this gives them instant protected access to your home.
  • Keep the inside door from your home to the garage LOCKED.
  • Don’t leave valuables in plain view, even if your car is locked. Take them in the house or put them in the trunk out of sight BEFORE arriving at your destination.

If you plan to be away:

  • Let a neighbor and/or block captain know you’ll be out of town and when you’ll return. They should have the following: your emergency contact information; contact information for anyone with access to your house (pet sitter, etc.); when they should be expected; what they look like and a description of their vehicle(s).
  • Let only those who NEED to know, know when you are going out of town.
  • Don’t share vacation plans on social media.
  • Arrange to have your lawn cared for if you are going to be away.
  • Don’t hide keys under doormats or flowerpots or in similar places.
  • Put your lights, stereo or TV on timers.
  • Leave a car in the driveway or ask a neighbor to park in it.
  • Don’t cancel your paper or mail deliveries; ask that your neighbor pick them up every day.
  • Leave a key with a friend or neighbor; ask that the house be checked at regular intervals.
  • Keep your house well lit at night (backyard included). A motion sensor or photocell activated light is an inexpensive deterrent.
  • Store all your valuables.
  • Consider asking friends or relatives to live in your home while you are away.
  • Ask your neighbor to put trash in your trashcan and to put it out for collection and away when they put theirs away.
  • File a Close Patrol Request. The filing of this form alerts patrolling officers so that they may pay close attention to one’s residence. To do so: Contact the Travis County Sheriff’s Office at 854-9721. Ask to make a Close Patrol Request. You will be asked for information on those caring for your home while you’re away i.e. make and model of their vehicles, name, description and times they should be at your home.

A comprehensive list of Safety Tips as well as numerous articles by the Travis County Sheriff Deputies are available on our website under Safety.

If you are not already, become a Wells Branch Neighborhood Association member. “Like” us on Facebook for community updates. The more community involvement and “connectedness” there is, the safer we all will be.

Most of all, be aware of your surroundings and look out for your neighbors. If you see or hear something suspicious, call 911. The Sheriff’s Department would much rather answer a false alarm than deal with a tragedy later.

We live in a GREAT community AND a SECURE neighborhood. Let’s all do our part to keep it that way. Here’s to a safe and happy holiday season!

*For information about starting your own Neighborhood Watch Group, please call Debby Thompson at 512-656-0654.

You! Go Call 911!

by John Grasshoff, Fire and Life Safety Specialist, ESD No. 2

You GO Call photo yCoach and health teacher David Sisson demonstrates the technique for TAKE 10-Compression-Only CPR to his health class students last week.  Approximately 60 students learned the technique and showed proficiency.

All the health teachers in the Pflugerville School District were trained this summer in a collaborative effort of TAKE 10 staff and the Pflugerville Fire Department.  Equipment was provided by the fire department.

Deena Bosier, District Health Curriculum Coordinator for PFISD and John Grasshoff, Fire and Life Safety Specialist with the fire department planned the training for the teachers.
“Having sixty more citizens with the confidence and training to act in the case of a cardiac arrest improves the survival rate in the City of Pflugerville,” said Grasshoff.

Health teachers throughout the district have begun training their students.

Fire Marshal logoTravis County Issues New Burn Ban

by Lisa Block, Travis County Emergency Services Public Information Officer

September 22, Travis County Commissioners Court issued a new ban on outdoor burning in the unincorporated areas of the County. The previous burn ban was set to expire Sept. 23.

“While parts of the County have received rain, other areas have not,” said Travis County Fire Marshal Hershel Lee. “Fires easily start and spread in dry vegetation. Until we see widespread rain throughout the County, a burn ban will help reduce the risk of wildfire.”

The burn ban is scheduled to expire on Oct. 21, unless action is taken by the County Judge, Commissioners Court or Fire Marshal.

Continue reading Travis County Issues New Burn Ban – Sept. 22

Fire Marshal logoTravis County Issues New Burn Ban

by Lisa Block, Travis County Emergency Services Public Information Officer

The Travis County Commissioners Court issued a new ban on outdoor burning in the unincorporated areas of the County. The previous burn ban was set to expire Aug. 26.

“While parts of the County have received rain, other areas have not,” said Travis County Fire Marshal Hershel Lee. “Fires easily start and spread in dry vegetation. Until we see widespread rain throughout the County, a burn ban will help reduce the risk of wildfire.”

The burn ban is scheduled to expire on Sept. 23, unless action is taken by the County Judge, Commissioners Court or Fire Marshal. Next Tuesday, Sept. 1, commissioners are scheduled to again consider and take appropriate action on outdoor burning.

Continue reading Travis County issues new burn ban

Extreme Clean  Flyer July 2015a copy

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Guidelines:
This is a BOPA Collection ONLY. Please read carefully as you will not be allowed to leave anything not included on the approved list at the Maintenance Yard. Thank you for your cooperation. If you have any questions, please call me at 512-656-0654.

What we CAN accept at the Maintenance Yard (13905 Thermal) tomorrow:
• Batteries: Car, Boat, Motorcycle, ALL Household
• Oil: Motor oil, both used & new, oil filters
• Paint: ALL Paint (cans, bottles)
• Anti-freeze: Just what it says – ANTI-FREEZE only
• Cooking Oil

What we CANNOT accept at the Maintenance Yard (13905 Thermal) tomorrow:
• Automotive Fluids other than Anti-freeze
• Gasoline
• Diesel Fuel
• Fluorescent Bulbs (try Lowes, Home Depot, Target)
• Cleaners
• Photographic Chemicals
• Mercury
• Radioactive Materials
• Medical Waste
• Tires
• Explosive Materials
• Business Waste
• Fertilizers, Pesticides & Herbicides – take to Dianne’s for repurposing
• Pool Chemicals – take to Dianne’s for repurposing
• Spray Paint (spray cans can go into your curbside blue recycling bin or you may drop them off at Dianne Koehler’s house – see below)
• Paint Thinner – take to Dianne’s for repurposing

What you should take to Dianne Koehler (14909 Alpha Collier) for repurposing:
All items must be in original packaging with instructions on them. If bags are not sealed, please do so before dropping off. No leaking containers as Dianne’s garden is organic. Please stack with like products.
• Fertilizers • Pesticides • Herbicides • Pool Chemicals • Spray Paint & Thinners

Broken Heart 2 Color tintedFebruary is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

Click HERE to learn some of the warning signs and dynamics of abusive relationships and also how to get help if you’re in a bad situation. The WBNA sponsors Teen Dating Violence Seminars. If you would be interested in attending an educational seminar on this subject or having one tailored to your teen’s peer group, please contact me we can set something up with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office. This is a great seminar for athletic clubs, choir, and band – anywhere you have a group of teens. Debby Thompson 656-0654 or deborah_thompson@earthlink.net.

Holiday Safety Tips

With the bustle of the holidays just around the corner, now is the time to make sure we’re taking every Santa Sneaky on Roof Colorprecaution to keep our homes and ourselves as safe as possible.  We usually see an increase in opportunistic crime this time of year; we need to be especially vigilant.

Keep your blinds and drapes closed when away, even if only for a short period of time.

Keep your house well lit at night (backyard included).  A motion sensor activated light is an inexpensive deterrent.

If your Christmas tree is displayed in front of a window, don’t pile the presents around it.  Store the gifts in another area away from view when the blinds or drapes are open.

Do NOT put the empty boxes for the new computer, TV, stereo system, etc. on the curb for the trash.  Take the time to break down every box and put it inside your trashcan/recycling bin so that it is concealed, even if you have to hold it over to the next week.  People start cruising our neighborhood on Sunday afternoons to see what has been put out.  The less they know, the better.

Door-to-door solicitations increase tremendously this time of year.  Always look out the window or peephole before opening the door or answering a knock.  Never open the door all the way, especially if you have a Christmas tree and/or presents in plain view.

While shopping this holiday season, remain aware of your surroundings at all times.  If unsure of your safety, ask a store attendant to have security walk you to your car.  You can’t be too safe.  This goes for trips to the grocery store as well.  When unloading your car at home after a day of shopping, lock it between trips to and from the car.

There has been an increase in car break-ins in Travis County in the last few months.   Don’t leave valuables in plain view, even if your car is locked.  Take them in the house or put them in the trunk out of sight BEFORE arriving at your destination.

Always lock your car.   Never leave your car running unattended or leave your keys in the car or ignition.  If you keep a garage door remote control in your car and don’t park it in the garage each and every time you return home, hide the remote.  Thieves check visors and this gives them instant protected access to your home.

If you plan to be away:

  • Let a neighbor and/or block captain know you’ll be out of town and when you’ll return.  They should have the following: your emergency contact information; contact information for anyone with access to your house (pet sitter, etc.); when they should be expected; what they look like and a description of their vehicle(s).
  • Let only those who NEED to know, know when you are going out of town.
  • Don’t share vacation plans on social media.
  • Arrange to have your lawn cared for if you are going to be away.
  • Don’t hide keys under doormats or flowerpots or in similar places.
  • Put your lights, stereo or TV on timers.
  • Leave a car in the driveway or ask a neighbor to park in it.
  • Don’t cancel your paper or mail deliveries; ask that your neighbor pick them up every day.
  • Leave a key with a friend or neighbor; ask that the house be checked at regular intervals.
  • Keep your house well lit at night (backyard included).  A motion sensor or photocell activated light is an inexpensive deterrent.
  • Store all your valuables.
  • Consider asking friends or relatives to live in your home while you are away.
  • Ask your neighbor to put trash in your trashcan and to put it out for collection and away when they put theirs away.
  • File a Close Patrol Request.  The filing of this form alerts patrolling officers so that they may pay close attention to one’s residence.  To do so: Contact the Travis County Sheriff’s Office at 854-9721.  Ask to make a Close Patrol Request.  You will be asked for information on those caring for your home while you’re away i.e. make and model of their vehicles, name, description and times they should be at your home.

A comprehensive list of Safety Tips as well as numerous articles by the Travis County Sheriff Deputies are available under our “Safety” tab.   If you are not already, become a Wells Branch Neighborhood Association member.  “Like” us on Facebook for community updates.  The more community involvement and connectedness there is, the safer we all will be.

Most of all, be aware of your surroundings and look out for your neighbors.  If you see or hear something suspicious, call 911.  The Sheriff’s Department would much rather answer a false alarm than deal with a tragedy later.

We live in a GREAT community AND a SECURE neighborhood.  Let’s all do our part to keep it that way.  Here’s to a safe and happy holiday season!

*For information about starting your own Neighborhood Watch Group, please call Debby Thompson at 512-656-0654 or Tom Cheshire at 512-913-3144.